C H U R C H   M E D I A

Recent Messages

April 2020

A Time for Lament (Psalm 77)

Introduction

Personal connection to Psalm in lieu of pandemic. I would like to invite you into my life this morning. I would like to set the table and have you sit down, so that I might offer a public confession this morning – not a public confession that you need to worry about. So then, let me set the table. This pandemic stinks. Self-isolation is hard. Seminary most certainly did not offer a class in how to pastor through a pandemic. I was never offered a class in



Victory of Christ’s Sufferings

An extremely challenging passage. This morning we step into a passage that might be considered an odd choice for an Easter Sunday service.

The first will consider the statement in 1 Peter 3:18, “For Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring us to God.”

Secondly, in verses 19 through 22, Peter discusses both a proclamation and salvation offered by and in Christ.



Belief, the Cure for a Troubled Heart (John 14:1-6)

Martin Luther called John chapter 14 “the best and most comforting sermon preached by Christ while on this earth . . . a jewel and a treasure not purchasable with the world’s goods.”[1]

John starts the chapter with a problem and then proceeds to offer the solution. The problem, “Let not your hearts be troubled” (Jn 14:1). We naturally possess stormy and troubled souls. Is your heart troubled today? I suppose in this present moment, that is a ridiculous



March 2020

Command to Love One Another (Jn 13:33-35)

Everyone wants a model to follow. In my classes, when a teacher assigns a specific type of paper, I often ask if he could offer an example of what he’s expecting. I can usually get online and download an example from the school library. I like to be able to follow a model that has been approved.

We are all this way. This is why we like perusing through Pinterest. We want to find examples of things we want to do by peo



Threefold Glory (John 13:31-33)

Last words. Last words can be significant, not always but sometimes. The sweet story is told of Richard Mellon, a multimillionaire and president of Alcoa, who played a game of tag with his brother that spanned seven decades. When Richard was on his deathbed, he called his brother over and whispered, “Last tag.” Poor Andrew remained “It” for four years, until he died.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who wrote the Sherlock Holmes stories, died at age 71 in his garden. He turned